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Disability pp 70-74 | Cite as

The Disabled Person as a Witness in Court

  • A. Carmi
Part of the Medicolegal Library book series (MEDICOLEGAL, volume 3)

Abstract

In practically every disputed case, part of the proof is based upon the alleged perception and memory of some witness or witnesses, who claim to have been present at some relevant past event. There is hardly any trial of importance in which the qualities and limitations of human perception and memory should not be carefully considered [1]. For the sake of discussion we shall deal separately with perception and memory; however, the first stages in the process of remembering are a direct continuation of the process of perception [2]. Memory overlaps with perceptual and decision processes as a synthesis of diverse cognitive activity [3].

Keywords

Past Event Proactive Interference Cognitive Dissonance Disable Person Forensic Psychiatry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Carmi

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