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Uncertainty, System Identification, and the Prediction of Water Quality

  • M. B. Beck

Abstract

There would be little disagreement among water quality modelers with the opinion of Orlob (1983a) that virtually all the significant developments since the (now) classical work of Streeter and Phelps (1925) have occurred within the past two decades. During the 1960s and early 1970s there was a very substantial investment in model-building associated with water quality management projects, particularly in the United States. The main legacy of this initial investment is a well-established interest in the development of progressively larger and more complex simulation models. “Large” is admittedly a rather imprecise description of a model, although a glance at some of the recent literature on water quality modeling will give some impression of the intended meaning (for example, Russell, 1975; Patten, 1975, 1976; Jørgensen and Harleman, 1978; Scavia and Robertson, 1979). There is no doubt that the immense scope for complex system simulation created by the advent of electronic computers has fostered the rapid growth of “large” water quality models.

Keywords

Water Quality Biochemical Oxygen Demand Extended Kalman fIlter Input Disturbance Dominant Approach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg/Austria 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. B. Beck
    • 1
  1. 1.International Institute for Applied Systems AnalysisLaxenburgAustria

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