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The Twin-Flow Microrespirometer and Simultaneous Calorimetry

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Abstract

Continuous long-term monitoring of respiratory rates in aquatic organisms is only possible in open-flow systems providing controlled environmental conditions during the experiment. This is a basic requirement for many topics in ecophysiological and applied research, and there is an apparent need for more detailed respiratory studies with organisms of different size and under a wide range of conditions. The most important aspects are: metabolic adaptation and acclimation to environmental factors (Chap. II.2); functional relations of oxygen uptake and locomotory activity (Chap. II.5) and growth; internal rhythms (Chap. II.7); quantification of respiratory energy loss complementing assimilation and production measurements in energy budget studies (Chap. III.4); sublethal effects of environmental contaminants; biological oxygen demand in water quality control.

Keywords

  • Oxygen Uptake
  • Heat Dissipation
  • Oxygen Uptake Rate
  • Heat Detector
  • Stainless Steel Capillary Tube

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 1983 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Gnaiger, E. (1983). The Twin-Flow Microrespirometer and Simultaneous Calorimetry. In: Gnaiger, E., Forstner, H. (eds) Polarographic Oxygen Sensors. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-81863-9_14

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-81863-9_14

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-642-81865-3

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-642-81863-9

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