Cellular Automata

(An Introduction)
  • Wolfgang Merzenich
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Biomathematics book series (LNBM, volume 4)

Abstract

The mathematical theory of cellular automata (CA) was first used by J. v. Neumann1 who showed that complex abstract machines (mathematical structures) have the property of reproducing themselves. So the self-reproducing property is not only specific for biological systems but turns out to be a property of complex structures.

Keywords

Dition 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Neumann, J.: Theory of Self-Reproducing Automata, ed. by A.W. Burks, University of Illinois Press, Urbana, 1966.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Burks, A.W. (Ed.): Essays on Cellular Automata, University of Illinois Press, Urbana, 1970.MATHGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Codd, E.F.: Cellular Automata, ACM-Monograph Series, Academic Press, New York, 1968.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Moore, E.F.: Machine models of self-reproduction, Proc. of Symp. in Appl. Math., vol. 14, AMS, 1962.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Myhill, J.: The converse of Moore’s Garden-of-Eden theorem, Proc. of the Amer. Math. Soc. 14, 685–686 (1963).MATHMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Smith III, A.R.: Cellular Automata Theory, Techn. Rep. No. 2, Stanford University, Dec. 1969.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Zuse, K.: Rechnender Raum, Schriften zur Datenverarbeitung, vol. 1 Vieweg & Sohn, Braunschweig, 1969.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Gardner, M.: On cellular automata, self-reproduction, the Garden-of-Eden and the game life, Sci. Amer. 224, 112–117 (1971).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wolfgang Merzenich
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of DortmundFed. Rep. Germany

Personalised recommendations