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Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Glycoprotein D Generated by Facilitated DNA Immunization of Mice

  • C. J. Pachuk
  • R. Arnold
  • K. Herold
  • R. B. Ciccarelli
  • T. J. Higgins
Chapter
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 226)

Abstract

Human herpetic infections have been described in ancient Greek and Roman times and are documented in the writings of both Hippocrates and Herodotus (Nahmias and Dowdle 1968). The causative agents of these infections are viruses belonging to a large family of vertebrate pathogens known as the Herpesviridae. Classification of viruses as Herpesviridae is based on virion structure. Viral particles are comprised of an icosohedral capsid surrounded by an amorphous tegument. The core of the virion, which is enclosed by the capsid, contains the viral genome, a linear double-stranded DNA molecule ranging in size from 100 to several hundred kilobase pairs. The viral particle is surrounded by an outer lipid envelope into which the virus encoded glycoproteins are inserted (Fields et al. 1990). Several of the viral glycoproteins, including glycoprotein D (gD) of HSV (as discussed below), are essential for a productive viral infection in humans (Hay and Ruyechan 1992).

Keywords

Herpes Simplex Herpes Simplex Virus Type Cellular Immune Response Genital Herpes Rous Sarcoma Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. J. Pachuk
    • 1
  • R. Arnold
    • 1
  • K. Herold
    • 1
  • R. B. Ciccarelli
    • 1
  • T. J. Higgins
    • 1
  1. 1.Apollon, Inc.MalvernUSA

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