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Epidemiology of Factor V Leiden Mutation in Various Populations: Northeastern Germany, Poland, Argentina, Venezuela, Costa Rica and India

  • F. H. Herrmann
  • M. Koesling
  • W. Schröder
  • R. Altman
  • R. Jimenez Bonilla
  • S. Lopaciuk
  • J. L. Perez-Requejo
  • J. R. Singh
Conference paper

Summary

Resistance to activated protein C (APC) is the most common inherited risk factor for venous thrombosis. The most cases of APC resistance are caused by the point mutation nt 1691 G→A in factor V gene referred to as factor V Leiden mutation. As initially shown in a Dutch population, this mutation is with a carrier rate of 2.9% the most frequent genetic disposition for thrombophilia and deep vein thrombosis.

By large scale epidemiological studies using capillar blood samples soaked onto filter paper test cards [13,14], we have determined the prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation in populations of north-eastern Germany (814 newborns), from Poland (200), Argentina (215), Venezuela (126), Costa Rica (198) and India (152). The prevalence of 7% in north-eastern Germany is significantly higher than that found in a Polish (Warsaw) population (5%).The prevalences are in populations of Argentina (Buenos Aires) 5.1%, in Venezuela (Valencia) 1.6%, in Costa Rica (San Jose) 2.0%, and in India (Punjab) 1.3% [7]. The world-wide distribution of factor V Leiden mutation is discussed.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. H. Herrmann
  • M. Koesling
  • W. Schröder
  • R. Altman
  • R. Jimenez Bonilla
  • S. Lopaciuk
  • J. L. Perez-Requejo
  • J. R. Singh

There are no affiliations available

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