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Automation of In Situ DNA Sample Preparation for PCR Using the FTA™ DNA Collection System and the Rosys Laboratory Workstation

  • P. Williams
  • S. Seim
  • L. Wiessner
  • P. Stover
  • H. Polesky
  • E. Heath
  • L. Hammer
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Forensic Haemogenetics book series (HAEMOGENETICS, volume 6)

Abstract

The development of dried blood stain technology has greatly facilitated the collection, transport, and isolation of DNA from blood samples. Blood stain cards are currently being used in clinical screening programs for Cystic Fibrosis (Audrezet and Costes, 1993; Raskin, 1992) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) (Nyambi, 1994; Cassol, 1991). Within the forensic community, blood stain cards are being used to collect DNA samples from convicted felons and/or sex offenders, as military reference samples (Williams et al., 1994), and for parentage testing. Current blood stain technology, which is based on the use of filter paper cards, has provided a simple system for the collection, transport, and storage of whole blood DNA samples. However, the DNA must be extracted from the blood stain card prior to amplification and analysis.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cystic Fibrosis Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type Potassium Acetate Magnesium Acetate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Williams
    • 1
  • S. Seim
    • 1
  • L. Wiessner
    • 1
  • P. Stover
    • 1
  • H. Polesky
    • 1
  • E. Heath
    • 1
  • L. Hammer
    • 1
  1. 1.Fitzco Inc.Maple PlainUSA

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