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The Russian National Medical and Dosimetric Registry

  • Wolfgang Morgenstern
  • Victor K. Ivanov
  • Anatoli I. Michalski
  • Anatoli F. Tsyb
  • Gotthard Schettler
Conference paper
Part of the Supplement zu den Sitzungsberichten der Mathematisch-naturwissenschaftlichen Klasse Jahrgang 1995 book series (HD AKAD, volume 1995 / 1995/2)

Abstract

Immediately after the accident in May 1986, the Ministry of Health of the former USSR convened an enlarged conference of experts engaged in organizing dispensary checkups of people exposed to radiation due to the Chernobyl accident. The conference issued a resolution on establishing the All-Union Distributed Registry of people exposed to radiation. The registry was intended for information support of the dispensary checkups in order to provide the necessary effective primary health care and clinical medical treatment as well as for ensuring appropriate long-term radiological and epidemiological monitoring of the population exposed to radiation in order to evaluate the effects of radiation on health. The All-Union Distributed Registry was a multi-level hierarchic information system (Radiation and Risk Bulletin of the Russian Medical-Dosimetric Registry 1992, Moscow Obninsk, Nl). Medical and dosimetric information was collected at the rajon (district), oblast (province) and republic level. The information collected was passed on to the national level. The Medical Radiological Research Center, Obninsk, of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences was the central, responsible institution at this level. These issues were regulated by a governmental order (The Ministry of Health of the USSR, Order N883, 21 June 1986).

Keywords

Populated Area Chernobyl Accident Radioactive Contamination Deposition Density Absorb Dose Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wolfgang Morgenstern
    • 1
  • Victor K. Ivanov
    • 2
  • Anatoli I. Michalski
    • 3
  • Anatoli F. Tsyb
    • 2
  • Gotthard Schettler
    • 1
  1. 1.Geomedical Research UnitHeidelberg Academy of the Humanities and SciencesHeidelbergGermany
  2. 2.Medical Radiological Research CentreRussian Academy of Medical SciencesObninsk, Kaluga RegionRussia
  3. 3.Institute of Control SciencesRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia

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