Astringency in Persimmon

  • S. Taira
Part of the Modern Methods of Plant Analysis book series (MOLMETHPLANT, volume 18)

Abstract

The genus Diospyros (family, Ebanaceae), to which persimmons belong, contains about 400 species, most of which are found in subtropical to tropical regions. The wood from certain species of the genus is used for furniture and the heads of golf clubs. For fruit production, only four species, D. kaki L., D. lotus L., D. virginiana L. and D. oleifera Cheng, are important (Kitagawa and Glucina 1984). D. kaki is also referred to as kaki (a word of Japanese origin meaning persimmon). It is the most important species, and the fruits are consumed both fresh and dried. The other three species are used mainly as a rootstock for persimmon or a source of tannins.

Keywords

Sugar Hydrolysis Dioxide Phenol Hydroxyl 

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

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  • S. Taira

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