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On Impact-Contact Algorithms for Parallel Distributed-Memory Computers

  • Edward J. Plaskacz
Conference paper

Abstract

Structural vulnerability applications are highly compute intensive. In studies of crashworthiness, impact and penetration, it is not unusual for an analysis to require 100 h of CPU time on current generation production supercomputers, despite the relative simplicity of the models being studied. The difficulty in obtaining blocks of time this large in a production environment severely impairs the number of design options that can be investigated. The lack of software capable of simultaneously, accurately capturing the physics of a crash event and exploiting the power of high-performance computer architectures necessitates costly experimental testing for design verification and certification. For example, in the design of automobiles for crashworthiness, hundreds of sled tests and dozens of full-vehicle crash tests are conducted for each new vehicle program. A sled test may cost $5000 and full-scale prototypes may cost as much as $750,000 each. The cost can be much greater (of the order of $10M) if a redesign results in retooling for a structural component late in the program. Attention has focused on high-performance computer architectures as an effective avenue to bridge the gap between computational needs and the power of computational hardware. New high-performance computer architectures promise order-of-magnitude increases in computational performance, thereby allowing the numerical laboratory to replace physical experiments to a much greater degree.

Keywords

Domain Decomposition Finite Element Mesh Interprocessor Communication Eulerian Grid Finite Element Algorithm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward J. Plaskacz
    • 1
  1. 1.Argonne National LaboratoryArgonneUSA

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