Front Tracking Simulations of Shock Refractions and Shock-Induced Mixing

  • John W. Grove
  • Brian Boston
  • Richard L. Holmes
Conference paper

Abstract

We discuss the use of front tracking to simulate shock reflections and shock-accelerated interfaces. Our simulations of regular Mach reflection show enhanced resolution of the primary waves in the interaction, and our computations of the growth rate of a Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable interface are the first numerical results that are in quantitative agreement with experiments on a shocked air-SF6 interface. Previous computations of the growth rate of the instability produced values that were almost twice those found in experiments.

Key words

Front tracking Mach reflection Richtmyer-Meshkov 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • John W. Grove
    • 1
  • Brian Boston
    • 1
  • Richard L. Holmes
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied Mathematics and StatisticsState University of New York at Stony BrookStony BrookUSA

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