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Use of the Novacor Left Ventricular Assist System as a Bridge to Cardiac Transplantation: First Experience with Long-term Patients on the Wearable System

  • H. O. Vetter
  • H. G. Kaulbach
  • M. Haller
  • T. Hummel
  • C. Schmitz
  • O. Dwvald
  • P. Brenner
  • E. Kreuzer
  • P. Überfuhr
  • B. Reichart
Chapter

Abstract

During the past decade, cardiac transplantation has become an accepted method in clinical therapy for end-stage heart disease. However, donor shortage is still responsible for a high percentage of patients dying while awaiting heart transplantation. Therefore, electrically powered ventricular assist devices [1] and pneumatically driven artificial hearts [2] were used in clinical programs to rescue critically ill cardiac transplant candidates.

Keywords

Pulmonary Capillary Wedge Pressure Cardiac Tamponade Mechanical Circulatory Support Acetyl Salicyl Wearable System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. O. Vetter
  • H. G. Kaulbach
  • M. Haller
  • T. Hummel
  • C. Schmitz
  • O. Dwvald
  • P. Brenner
  • E. Kreuzer
  • P. Überfuhr
  • B. Reichart

There are no affiliations available

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