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Two-Dimensional Arrangement of InSb Epitaxial Nanoscale Crystals on Selenium-Treated Terraced GaAs Substrates

  • Y. Watanabe
  • F. Maeda
  • M. Oshima
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Series in Materials Science book series (SSMATERIALS, volume 31)

Abstract

Molecular beam epitaxial InSb nanoscale crystals on selenium-treated GaAs substrates have been studied by in situ synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SRPES), in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The SRPES results show that room-temperature deposited Sb atoms on Se-passivated GaAs were desorbed from the surface when the sample was heated to 200°C, indicating that Sb atoms do not react with the topmost surface Se atoms at this temperature. The results of RHEED pattern observations suggest that InSb nanometer-size islands surrounded by (111) facets are grown on the Se-passivated GaAs surface at 200°C whereas an InSb layer with a nominal thickness of 1 monolayer is formed on the clean GaAs surface. Furthermore, geometrical arrangement of the InSb nanocrystals grown on the Se-treated, terraced GaAs(001) has been characterized by AFM. It has been found that, by using terraced substrates, two-dimensional alignment of InSb nanocrystals can be formed, which implies that this phenomenon is associated with preferential nucleation of InSb on the step edges of the terraces.

Keywords

Atomic Force Microscopy Image GaAs Substrate GaAs Surface RHEED Pattern Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Watanabe
    • 1
  • F. Maeda
    • 1
  • M. Oshima
    • 1
  1. 1.NTT Interdisciplinary Research LaboratoriesMusashino-shi, Tokyo 180Japan

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