Appearance of very electrophilic species generated by some iron oxides: effect of iron chelators and reducing agents

  • Salem Chouchane
  • Joëlle Guignard
  • Henri Pezerat
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 85)

Abstract

It is now well known that asbestos fibers are responsible of several lung diseases. This toxicity is suggested to be due to the presence of Fe(II) in the structure of the fibers, or in their contaminants (Zalma et al 1987). Moreover, an excess incidence of lung cancer has been found among workers in various metal mines (Mur et al 1987), in iron and steel foundries (IARC monographs 1984) and also among arc welding workers (IARC monographs 1990) pointing to possible carcinogenic properties of iron-containing mineral dusts. In the case of Fe(II) compounds, this toxicity is due to the activation of dioxygen in biological medium by divalent iron appearing at the interface solid-liquid or in solution, which may lead to the formation of various activated oxygen species (AOS). In the set of these AOS, the very electrophilic species are symbolized by A* (Pezerat 1991); they include ferryl, perferryl and OH. (Yamazaki et al 1990 and Bielski et al 1992). The quantitation of the oxidizing power of the A* species is obtained through a reaction of H abstraction between A* and a target molecule, the formate anion (Zalma et al 1987). The production of the C0 2 - · is measured using a spin-trap agent, the DMPO (5-5’-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide), giving an adduct (DMPO, CO 2 - whose life time allows its identification by ESR spectroscopy.

Keywords

Toxicity Dust Welding Cysteine Adduct 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Salem Chouchane
    • 1
  • Joëlle Guignard
    • 1
  • Henri Pezerat
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Réactivité de SurfaceUniversité P. et M. Curie, CNRS URA 1106Paris Cédex 05France

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