Multidrug Resistance in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Relevance to Clinical and Laboratory Data

  • Andrey Zaritskey
  • Irina Stuf
  • Tatyana Bykova
  • Kirill Titov
  • Nadezhda Medvedeva
  • Natalya Anikina
  • Boris Afanasiev
Conference paper
Part of the Haematology and Blood Transfusion / Hämatologie und Bluttransfusion book series (HAEMATOLOGY, volume 37)

Abstract

MDR1 gene is responsible for resistance to a number of drugs conventionally used for the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia in vitro and in vivo [1,2]. The clinical significance of this fact is still obscure. There are no consice clinical data, randomized trials and wide retrospective studies proving the necessity of adding drugs for overcoming MDR1 gene expression to conventional chemotherapy [2,3]. The possible role of other genes involved in cell cycle regulation and apoptosis (myc, p53, c-kit, TGF-beta)on the results of chemotherapy is also discussed [6]. Moreover it was shown that some of the above mentioned genes are mutually regulated [7].

Keywords

Leukemia Oncol Resis Cyclosporin Etoposide 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrey Zaritskey
    • 1
  • Irina Stuf
    • 1
  • Tatyana Bykova
    • 1
  • Kirill Titov
    • 1
  • Nadezhda Medvedeva
    • 1
  • Natalya Anikina
    • 1
  • Boris Afanasiev
    • 1
  1. 1.1st Pavlov Medical Institute, Institute of OncologyBMT Centre for Advanced Medical TechnologiesSt. PetersburgRussia

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