Ultraviolet Light and Electron Beam Induced Degradation of Trichloroethene

  • H. Scheytt
  • H. Esrom
  • L. Prager
  • R. Mehnert
  • C. von Sonntag
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 34)

Abstract

Chlorinated hydrocarbons such as trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene are widely used as solvents and degreasing agents. Emission of these volatile compounds causes considerable environmental pollution. In the extreme case of spillage by accident or criminal negligence, they quickly penetrate into the soil and the groundwater table on account of their relatively high specific weight compared to water and their fluidity. In the soil under anaerobic conditions, these compounds undergo bacterial degradation, prominent products being cis-1,2-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride whose carcinogenic potential is known (Nerger and Mergler-Völkl, 1988).

Keywords

Quartz Mercury Hydrocarbon Propane Chlorinate 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Scheytt
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. Esrom
    • 2
  • L. Prager
    • 3
  • R. Mehnert
    • 3
  • C. von Sonntag
    • 4
  1. 1.Institut für Chemische TechnikUniversität KarlsruheKarlsruheGermany
  2. 2.Corporate Research CenterAsea Brown Boveri AGHeidelbergGermany
  3. 3.Institut für OberflächenmodifizierungLeipzigGermany
  4. 4.Max-Planck-Institut für StrahlenchemieMülheim/RuhrGermany

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