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The Viability of Small Populations of Birds: an Empirical Investigation of Vulnerability

  • P. G. Ryan
  • W. R. Siegfried
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 106)

Abstract

The likelihood of the extinction of a significant portion of the world’s biota during the next several decades is cause for concern. This has given rise to the discipline of conservation biology, with the concomitant attempt to predict minimum viable population sizes (MVP) as one of its central themes. A substantial literature on MVP has arisen in the decade since the concept was introduced (Shaffer 1981; Schonewald-Cox et al. 1983; Soulé 1986, 1987a; Simberloff 1988), but guidelines for estimating MVP have been based primarily on theoretical considerations (Simberloff 1988; Thomas 1990). There are good reasons for this bias.

Keywords

Small Population Effective Population Size Conservation Biology Inbreeding Depression Island Population 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. G. Ryan
  • W. R. Siegfried

There are no affiliations available

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