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Sources, Nature and Levels of Air Pollutants

  • Lawrence Fishbein
Part of the Monographs book series (ESO MONOGRAPHS)

Abstract

A broad spectrum of potentially toxic chemicals spanning many inorganic and organic structural categories, is released into local, regional and global atmospheres from both natural and anthropogenic sources and from both industrialised [1–13]. In one data base compilation, more than 2,800 atmospheric compounds were identified of which more than 300 (about 11%) have been bioassayed [1]. More than 65,000 chemicals are used in commerce in the industrialised nations of the world. Many of these substances, e.g., industrial solvents, VOCs, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, and aerosol products containing volatile pro-pellants and active ingredients (as well as trace contaminants such as chlorinated dibenzodioxins and furans) are emitted directly or indirectly into the atmosphere because of human activities [3,11–13]. These atmospheric pollutants can be transported over great distances to further exhibit a variety of deleterious impacts on human health and the environment quite distant from their original emission sites [1–13].

Keywords

Ozone Concentration Nitrogen Oxide Ozone Depletion Carcinogenic Risk Methyl Butyl Tertiary Ether 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence Fishbein
    • 1
  1. 1.Office of Toxicology SciencesCenter for Food Safety and Nutrition, Food and Drug AdministrationUSA

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