Prostatitis pp 123-130 | Cite as

Experimental Prostatitis

  • J. C. Nickel
  • M. E. Olson
  • H. Ceri

Abstract

Prostatitis remains an enigma despite decades of clinical research (Pfau 1986; Nickel and Olson 1991). The generally held assumption in the medical community that our urologic management of this disease remains poor likely reflects our continued lack of a solid understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of prostatitis, diagnostic systems that have been abandoned by most physicians, and clinical cure rates that are among the poorest in infectious diseases (Nickel 1992). Since not all the answers are forthcoming in our extensive clinical investigations, can experimental prostatitis offer further insight into this complex disease? In fact many of the major advances in prostate research were made possible by animal models (i.e., etiology of benign prostatic hyperplasia, androgen and antiandrogens, oncogenes, the dihydrotestosterone and 5α-reductase story etc.). In this chapter we examine a number of animal models of experimental prostatitis that have led to insights into this complex infectious disease. Animal models allow us to study the initiation and pathogenesis of disease processes in a longitudinal fashion and enable us to change experimental parameters to determine their relative influence on the progression of the disease. New diagnostic systems can be rigorously tested, and various treatments including the question of antibiotic pharmacokinetics can be explored under the various conditions.

Keywords

Nickel Urea Estrogen Testosterone Expense 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. C. Nickel
  • M. E. Olson
  • H. Ceri

There are no affiliations available

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