Impact of Endothelial Cell-Seeding with Omentally Derived Microvascular Cells on the Long-Term Patency and Neointimal Hyperplasia in Small-Diameter Dacron Grafts

  • M. Pasic
  • W. Müller-Glauser
  • M. Lachat
  • P. Bittermann
  • L. von Segesser
  • M. Turina
Conference paper
Part of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Chirurgie book series (DTGESCHIR, volume 93)

Abstract

Although it has been shown that endothelial cell-seeding may reduce anastomotic intimal hyperplasia in animals with good early and midterm results [1], no long-term data are available. Anastomotic hyperplasia is characteristic of the normal healing process, but its precise control and the influence of complete endothelialization of a seeded prosthetic graft have still not been completely understood [2]. Microvascular cells derived from omental tissue allow immediate high-density seeding; however, the isolates contain not only endothelial cells, but also a variety of other cell types [3]. Despite approximately 95% endothelialization at 4 weeks, an inner capsule continues to accumulate beneath the endothelial monolayer [4], remaining a potential hazard for late occlusion during the long-term period [5].

Autotransplantation von mikrovaskulären Endothelzellen des Omentums mit kleinlumigen Dacronprothesen: Langzeitdurchgängigkeit und Neointimabildung

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Pasic
    • 1
    • 3
  • W. Müller-Glauser
    • 1
  • M. Lachat
    • 1
  • P. Bittermann
    • 2
  • L. von Segesser
    • 1
  • M. Turina
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinic for Cardiovascular SurgeryUniversity Hospital ZurichSwitzerland
  2. 2.Sulzer Medical Technology, Ltd.WinterthurSwitzerland
  3. 3.Clinic for Cardiovascular SurgeryUniversity Hospital ZürichZürichSwitzerland

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