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Regeneration of Plants from Protoplasts of Agrostis alba (Redtop)

  • Y. Asano
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 22)

Abstract

The genus Agrostis, of the Gramineae, includes about 125 species that occur in temperate and subarctic climates as well as at high altitudes in tropical and subtropical zones. A. alba (Redtop) (Fig. 1) is native to Europe, Asia, and N. America and adapts to a wide range of soil conditions in these areas. A. alba is an economically important grass cultivated as a pasture grass and as a hay crop in temperate regions around the world. It is also used as a component of cool-season turf.

Keywords

Somatic Embryo Suspension Culture Embryogenic Callus Embryogenic Suspension Culture Protoplast Yield 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Asano
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of HorticultureChiba UniversityKashiwa city, Chiba Pref. 277Japan

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