Secondary Rise of Intracranial Pressure Following Severe Head Injury

  • A. Unterberg
  • K. Kiening
  • P. Schmiedek
  • W. Lanksch
Conference paper

Abstract

Intracranial pressure is frequently increased, following severe head injury. Usually intracranial hypertension is maximal one to three days following trauma [5]. Sometimes, however, severely injured patients develop a later, second rise of intracranial pressure following the initial peak. There are only few reports about long term observations of ICP following trauma [3, 5]. Thus, the purpose of this study was (a) to analyze different types of ICP courses following trauma, (b) to characterize the secondary rise of intracranial pressure and (c) to search for possible causes.

Keywords

Mannitol Furosemide Barbiturate 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Unterberg
    • 1
  • K. Kiening
    • 1
  • P. Schmiedek
    • 2
  • W. Lanksch
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurosurgery, Universitätsklinikum Rudolf VirchowFree University of BerlinBerlin 65Germany
  2. 2.Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum GroßhadernLudwig-Maximilians-UniversityMünchen 70Germany

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