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β2-Microglobulinuria as an early sign of cytomegalovirus infection following renal transplantation

  • J. Steinhoff
  • A. Feddersen
  • W. G. Wood
  • J. Hoyer
  • G. Bein
  • G. Wiedemann
  • L. Fricke
  • K. Sack
Conference paper

Abstract

The frequency of cytomegalovirus infection was studied in a prospective study of 106 kidney recipients. The detection of cytomegalovirus-immediate-early-antigen and cytomegalovirus-immunoglobulin (IgM) antibodies in serum was used as the reference method and showed that 23.6% (25/106) of all patients were infected. In addition, four urinary proteins (IgG and transferrin as glomerular markers and α1-microglobulin and β2-microglobulin as tubular markers) were quantitatively measured in 24-h urine samples from all of the patients using an immunoluminometric assay (ILMA). In all cytomegalovirus infection cases a pronounced but isolated increase of urinary β2-microglobulin excretion was observed. In 20 of 25 infected patients, the p2-microglo-bulinuria occurred 1–21 days (median 5.0) earlier than the appearance of the cytomegalovirus-immediate-early-antigen in blood. Thus, it can be seen that the quantitative measurement of β2-microglobulin in urine is useful for the early detection of cytomegalovirus infection following renal transplantation.

Key words

Renal transplantation Cytomegalovirus Proteinuria β2-Microglobulin Cytomegalovirus-immediate-early-antigen 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Steinhoff
    • 1
  • A. Feddersen
    • 1
  • W. G. Wood
    • 1
  • J. Hoyer
    • 1
  • G. Bein
    • 2
  • G. Wiedemann
    • 1
  • L. Fricke
    • 1
  • K. Sack
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Internal MedicineMedical University of LübeckLübeckFederal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Departments of Immunology and Transfusion MedicineMedical University of LübeckLübeckFederal Republic of Germany

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