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Risk factors for development of panel reactive antibodies and their impact on kidney transplantation outcome

  • Th. Sautner
  • M. Gnant
  • C. Banhegyi
  • P. Wamser
  • P. Götzinger
  • R. Steininger
  • F. Mühlbacher
Conference paper

Abstract

The impact of potential risk factors for development of panel reactive antibodies (PRA) in 1078 cadaveric kidney graft recipients was investigated in a multivariate analysis. Multiple transplantation, transfusion of more than five blood units and more than two pregnancies were revealed as factors with a significant independent impact on the formation of high levels of PRA. Multiple transplantation and polytransfusion also affected primary non-function, initial function and long-term graft survival at 1, 3 and 5 years. Incidence of early rejection (within 30 days) was significantly increased with repeated transplantation and decreased with a full-house HLA match. However, these effects on transplantation outcome could only be observed when risk factors lead to the formation of antibodies. In patients with risk factors present, but without subsequent sensitization, the graft survival expectation was the same as in patients in whom risk factors were absent.

Key words

Panel reactive antibodies Risk factors Kidney transplantation Transplantation outcome 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Th. Sautner
    • 1
  • M. Gnant
    • 1
  • C. Banhegyi
    • 1
  • P. Wamser
    • 1
  • P. Götzinger
    • 1
  • R. Steininger
    • 1
  • F. Mühlbacher
    • 1
  1. 1.I. Chirurgische UniversitätsklinikWienAustria

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