Removal of Lipophilic Toxins from Blood by Matrix-Supported Lipid Materials

  • D. Tsikas
  • G. Brunner

Abstract

During hepatic failure hydrophilic and lipophilic toxins accumulate in the blood and tissues. Such toxins have synergistic effects on each other and lead to the development of hepatic encephalopathy and/or cause coma [1–4]. Elimination of toxins from blood improves liver functions. Therefore, one main goal of an extracorporeal liver support system is the effective and selective removal of toxins from blood. Biocompatibility and immunological safety are important criteria that also have to be fulfilled by an artificial liver support system.

Keywords

Surfactant Sulphide Phenol Albumin Histamine 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Tsikas
  • G. Brunner

There are no affiliations available

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