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Allele Frequencies for Five Different Single Locus Probes in a Population of South-West Germany

  • W. Pflug
  • G. Bäßler
  • G. Mai
  • U. Keller
  • S. Aab
  • B. Eberspächer
  • G. Wahl
Part of the Advances in Forensic Haemogenetics book series (HAEMOGENETICS, volume 4)

Abstract

In forensic science case work DNA analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP’s) has become the most powerful method. Nearly all labs working in the field of stain analysis prefer single locus probes (SLP’s) because these probes have a better sensitivity than multilocus probes and offer the possibility of building a database for the alleles frequency. In routine case work in our lab we use 4 – 5 single locus probes and the results of DNA analysis are reported as frequency data. The precision of measuring fragment lengths i. e. the differences that may occur for the same individual on different blots was determined and is subsequently taken into consideration. For calculating the frequency we use the “sliding window” routine, a conservative method of frequency determination (Gill et al.). Up to now the only frequency data for a german population come from the area of Dusseldorf (Henke et al.). To compare the frequency data from Henke with the distribution in our area of South-West Germany, we analyzed about 360 unrelated individuals.

Keywords

Allele Frequency Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Frequency Data Unrelated Individual German Population 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Pflug
    • 1
  • G. Bäßler
    • 1
  • G. Mai
    • 1
  • U. Keller
    • 1
  • S. Aab
    • 1
  • B. Eberspächer
    • 1
  • G. Wahl
    • 1
  1. 1.Landeskriminalamt Baden-WürttembergStuttgartGermany

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