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Health Effects of Indoor Air Exposures

  • M. Lippmann
Conference paper
Part of the ILSI Monographs book series (ILSI MONOGRAPHS)

Abstract

The pollutants inhaled in nonoccupational indoor settings can produce a variety of health effects, with the impacts being dependent on the nature of the pollutants, their concentrations, time spent indoors, respiratory rates, interindividual susceptibility to the effects of the specific pollutants, and the interactive effects of the multiple pollutant exposures. These basic considerations are well-known to those engaged in inhalation research. There have been a series of learned monographs on the health effects of indoor air, beginning with a National Research Council Report (NRC 1981), as well as international symposia on this topic at 3-year intervals since 1978 (Copenhagen, Amherst, Stockholm, Berlin, and Toronto). The Environmental Protection Agency has compiled a reference bibliography on indoor air containing 4367 citations (EPA 1989). This purpose of this presentation is to summarize current knowledge on the risks to passive building occupants from exposures to some of the indoor pollutants that have been the subject of major concern: radon (Rn) and daughters, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), asbestos fibers, and unvented combustion products. Another important class of indoor air pollutants, the volatile organic chemicals, is addressed by Dr. Mølhave in another chapter.

Keywords

Environmental Tobacco Smoke Indoor Radon Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure Asbestos Fiber Radon Exposure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Lippmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Nelson Inst. of Environmental MedicineN.Y. University Medical CenterTuxedoUSA

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