Vertebrate Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle

  • Perry M. Hogan
  • Stephen R. Besch
Part of the Advances in Comparative and Environmental Physiology book series (COMPARATIVE, volume 17)

Abstract

The use of hydrostatic pressure as an experimental probe for studying muscle contraction has had a rich history dating back to the beginning of this century. Most notably, the early, careful work of the American physiologists, McKeen Cattell, Dayton Edwards and Dugald Brown, provided a remarkably complete description of pressure-dependent phenomena in intact vertebrate striated muscle. As knowledge of the cellular and molecular bases for muscle contraction has advanced, it has again become profitable to employ hydrostatic pressure to further characterize individual cellular components of this system and, perhaps more importantly, to use pressure as a means for delineating interactions between these components. In this chapter, we will first survey the actions of elevated hydrostatic pressure on skeletal muscle, and then, relate these findings to our present understanding of cellular mechanisms of muscle contraction, with special emphasis given to recent discoveries regarding the actions of pressure on specific functional elements of the muscle cell. We will then extend this analysis to cardiac muscle, and to an additional mechanism unique to this tissue.

Keywords

Fatigue Hydrolysis Hydration Rubber Adenosine 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Perry M. Hogan
    • 1
  • Stephen R. Besch
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of PhysiologyState University of New York at BuffaloBuffaloUSA

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