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Differential Disturbances of Memory and Mood Following Striatum and Basal Forebrain Lesions in Patients with Ruptures of the Anterior Communicating Artery

  • E. Irle
  • B. Wowra
  • J. Kunert
  • M. Peper
  • J. Hampl
  • S. Kunze
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Neurosurgery book series (NEURO, volume 20)

Abstract

For a long time, it has been known that subarachnoid hemorrhage is likely to be followed by Korsakoff’s syndrome [13]. However, in many of the patients the syndrome is transient. The remaining patients may show persistent anterograde memory deficits, as well as personality changes. This lasting syndrome is often referred to as ACoA (anterior communicating artery) syndrome because it is observed most often following the rupture and repair of an aneurysm of the ACoA [12].

Keywords

Basal Forebrain Lesion Group Aneurysm Patient Striate Lesion Anterior Communicate Artery Aneurysm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Irle
    • 1
  • B. Wowra
    • 2
  • J. Kunert
    • 1
  • M. Peper
    • 1
  • J. Hampl
    • 2
  • S. Kunze
    • 2
  1. 1.Psychiatrische UniversitätsklinikGöttingenGermany
  2. 2.Neurochirurgische UniversitätsklinikHeidelbergGermany

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