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New perspectives in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia by hematopoietic growth factors

  • W. Hiddemann
  • B. Wörmann
  • M. Zühlsdorf
  • C. Reuter
  • E. Schleyer
  • C. Busemann
  • M. Kiehl
  • H. Garritsen
  • M. Königsmann
  • A. Boeckmann
  • T. Büchner

Abstract

In the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) major improvements have been achieved in the late 1960ies and 1970ies when anthracyclines and cytosine arabinoside (AraC) were introduced and applied in combination. Since then progress has sub-stantially slowed down although more effective supportive measures led to a reduction in early death rate and provided the basis for intensified initial therapy such as “double induction” developed by the German AML-Cooperative Group (AMLCG) (1,2). A current update of this approach indicates not only a high remission rate but also strongly suggests a considerable increase in long term survival (3). Still, the major problems in AML treatment remain early deaths during the initial phase of therapy, the primary resistance of leukemic cells against the applied cytostatic drugs and the high rate of leukemic relapses after successful first line treatment which is reduced but not prevented by prolonged myelosuppressive maintenance therapy (4).

Keywords

Acute Myeloid Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patient Cytosine Arabinoside Leukemic Blast Acute Myeloblastic Leukaemia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Hiddemann
    • 1
  • B. Wörmann
    • 1
  • M. Zühlsdorf
    • 1
  • C. Reuter
    • 1
  • E. Schleyer
    • 1
  • C. Busemann
    • 1
  • M. Kiehl
    • 1
  • H. Garritsen
    • 1
  • M. Königsmann
    • 1
  • A. Boeckmann
    • 1
  • T. Büchner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of MünsterMünsterGermany

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