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Every interactive system evolves into hyperspace: The case of the Smart Game Board

  • Anders Kierulf
  • Ralph Gasser
  • Peter M. Geiser
  • Martin Müller
  • Jurg Nievergelt
  • Christoph Wirth
Part of the Informatik-Fachberichte book series (INFORMATIK, volume 276)

Abstract

Although an interactive system may be dedicated to a specific application, if it aims at a heterogeneous user community it must provide many application-independent functions, such as: User interface, an explanatory and communications component, and data base functions for data structuring and visualization. In other words, every user-friendly interactive application evolves into a hypermedia system. We present a case study of this phenomenon for an esoteric application: The Smart Game Board evolved from a computerized board and a programmer’s workbench into a powerful tool that supports game fans in the many functions they normally perform using a wooden board and paper: playing, analyzing, annotating, organizing and storing game collections. The special nature of these documents is reflected in highly specialized support functions, such as searching for patterns in a collection of Go games.

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Copyright information

© Springer-verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anders Kierulf
    • 1
  • Ralph Gasser
    • 1
  • Peter M. Geiser
    • 1
  • Martin Müller
    • 1
  • Jurg Nievergelt
    • 1
  • Christoph Wirth
    • 1
  1. 1.InformatikETHZurichSwitzerland

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