Advertisement

The Relationship between Certain Anthropometric Characteristics and Parameters of Anaerobic Capacity in the Treadmill Test According to Kindermann

  • M. Misigoj-Duraković
  • S. Heimer
  • R. Medved
  • K. Bosnar
Conference paper

Abstract

Insight into the relationship between various characteristics of the organism and its energy capacities depends to a substantial degree on the availability of valid measuring instruments for the assessment of these characteristics and capacities. A series of studies have been carried out to determine the relations between individual biological characteristics and aerobic energy capacity, for which we have a reliable, valid test, that of maximum oxygen uptake. Since there is no generally accepted test for the assessment of anaerobic energy capacity, it is not surprising that our knowledge of the relationship between that energy capacity and the other biological characteristics is still rather sketchy, even with respect to such easily measurable ones as the morphological anthropometric characteristics. This is particularly due to the circumstance that studies conducted to measure anaerobic energy capacity have used different tests. These tests can be grouped into two classes, according to the results of the factor analysis obtained by Beckenholdt and Mayhew (1): tests whose results predominantly depend on the display of power (e.g. explosive power measured during standing jump (W), the Margaria test modified according to Kalaman (W)) and tests in which the results mainly depend on the speed of movement (sprint (s), jumps (cm)).

Keywords

Endurance Time Anthropometric Characteristic Energy Capacity Anaerobic Capacity Canonical Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    BECKENHOLDT S.E., Mayhew J.L.: Specificity among anaerobic power tests in male athletes, J. Sports Med. Phys. Fitness, 23: 326–332, 1983.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    MAYHEW J.L., Piper F.C. and Holmes J.A.: Prediction of body density, fat weight and lean body mass in male athletes. J. Sports Med. Phys. Fitness. 21: 383–389. 1981.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    MEDVED R. et al.: Sportska medicina. Jumena, Zagreb, 1987.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    MOMIROVIC K., Dobric V., Karaman Z.: Canonical covariance analysis. Proceeding of 5th International symposium “Computor at the University”, The University Computing centre Zagreb, 463–473, 1983.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    WATSON A.W.S.: Distribution of sub-cutaneous fat in sportsmen: relationship to anaerobic power-output. J. Sports Med. Phys. Fitness 24: 195–204, 1984.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    WERNIER J.S., Lorie J.A.: Human Biology: A guide to Field Methods, Blackwell, Oxford, 1969.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Misigoj-Duraković
    • 1
  • S. Heimer
    • 1
  • R. Medved
    • 1
  • K. Bosnar
    • 1
  1. 1.Insititue of Kinesiological Anthropology, Faculty of Physical CultureUniversity of ZagrebZagrebYugoslavia

Personalised recommendations