Patient Matching: A Decision Support for Liver Transplantation

  • G. Tusch
  • G. Gubernatis
Conference paper

Abstract

The outcome of a liver transplantation depends heavily on the preoperative state of the patient. Furthermore, the transplantation procedure itself, including the quality of the donor organ, has a strong influence on the early postoperative course. In this phase the required therapy regimen in concurrence with immunological and non-immunological processes has a strong impact on the final outcome of the transplantation. These processes and factors cannot be observed themselves; they are represented by a huge amount of clinical data. The meaning of individual parameters and their combinations is still largely unknown and have been judged until now mostly on the basis of clinical experience. There is a lack of statistical evaluation of the data and especially of the accurate definition of clinical concepts in terms of these parameters.

Keywords

Bilirubin Peri 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Tusch
  • G. Gubernatis

There are no affiliations available

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