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Postoperative Changes in Nerve Conduction Times After Neurolysis of the Distal Median Nerve

  • S. A. Rath
  • H. J. Klein
  • A. Kühn
  • V. Wippermann
Conference paper

Abstract

The median nerve conduction velocity and particularly the delayed distal latency of the muscular response potential (DML, distal motor latency) constitute — in addition to the clinical symptoms — the electrophysiological confirmation of carpal tunnel syndrome [2, 3, 6]. Since, however, a clinically relevant carpal tunnel syndrome in need of surgical therapy may also be found with normal nerve conduction times, DML is only an additional diagnostic measure secondary to the clinical signs [1, 4]. Furthermore, neurophysiological methods do not permit the differentiation of patients by those suited for conservative treatment and those who must be operated on. It is also not possible to derive any prognostic statements from the preoperative measurements [4].

Keywords

Median Nerve Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Distal Latency Surgical Decompression Average Improvement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Leblhuber F, Reisecker F, Witzmann A (1985) Zur Frage elektrodiagnostischer Veränderungen in bezug auf die Schwere morphologischer Veränderungen beim Karpaltunnelsyndrom. In: Hohmann D (ed) Neuroorthopädie III. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York Tokyo, pp 332–336.Google Scholar
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    Thomas JE, Lambert EH, Csenz KA (1967) Electrodiagnostic aspects of the carpal tunnel syndrome. Archs Neurol (Chicago) 16:635–641.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. A. Rath
    • 1
  • H. J. Klein
    • 1
  • A. Kühn
    • 1
  • V. Wippermann
    • 1
  1. 1.GünzburgGermany

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