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Amorolfine

  • Annemarie Polak
  • Michel Zaug
Part of the Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology book series (HEP, volume 96)

Abstract

Amorolfine (3-[p-(1,1-dimethylpropyl)-phenyl]2-methyl-propyl-2,6-cis dimethylmorpholine hydrochloride; Ro 14-4767/002) shows activity against fungi pathogenic to plants, animals and humans (Polak and Dixon 1987). Given here is a resume of preclinical findings with this drug as well as a summary of published clinical data. In vitro the spectrum against representative species pathogenic for humans was defined measuring fungistatic as well as fungicidal effects. In vivo studies were conducted using models of dermatophytosis, vaginal candidosis and various organ mycoses.

Keywords

Antifungal Activity Tinea Pedis Local Adverse Effect Mycological Cure Mucor Circinelloides 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Annemarie Polak
  • Michel Zaug

There are no affiliations available

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