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Helicobacter pylori Hemagglutinins — Possible Gut Mucosa Adhesins

  • T. Wadström
  • J. L. Guruge
  • S. Wei
  • P. Aleljung
  • A. Ljungh

Abstract

A number of recent studies indicate that Helicobacter pylori has unique cellular properties which allow this pathogen to colonize the human stomach mucosa [1,2,4,7]. Despite this unique habitat for this microbe, very few studies have tried to identify surface proteins and other possible structures determining an association with the stomach mucosa. Emödy et al. [2] reported on surface hemagglutinins in H. pylori followed by reports from the USA, Ireland, and Japan. Studies by Emödy et al. [2] and Carlsson et al. [1] have defined a sialic acid specific hemagglutinin. More recently, a Canadian group of investigators defined a surface component of H. pylori interacting with a glycolipid from human erythrocyte membranes [5]. Furthermore, Huang et al. [4] described a hemagglutinin which caused neuraminidase and protease resistant hemagglutination. In view of these findings we decided to carry out a systematic study on H. pylori hemagglutinin profiles by screening clinical isolates and type culture collection strains for hemagglutination with a variety of erythrocytes.

Keywords

Pylorus Strain Cell Surface Hydrophobicity Erythrocyte Suspension Human Erythrocyte Membrane Gastric Mucosal Barrier 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Wadström
    • 1
  • J. L. Guruge
    • 1
  • S. Wei
    • 1
  • P. Aleljung
    • 1
  • A. Ljungh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical MicrobiologyUniversity of LundLundSweden

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