Clandestine Drug Manufacturing Laboratories

  • Richard S. Frank
  • Stanley P. Sobol
Part of the Forensic Science Progress book series (FORENSIC, volume 4)

Abstract

Clandestine, or illegal, drug manufacturing laboratories have been established by the criminal element for the purpose of supplying drugs of abuse to the illicit market. This article will review the significant role of forensic scientists in identifying and immobilizing clandestine laboratories. To accomplish this role, the forensic scientist must be familiar with the methods of synthesis for the drugs being produced in these laboratories. As an aide to forensic scientists, the article will examine the drugs being synthesized in clandestine laboratories, the methods of synthesis commonly being used by clandestine laboratory operators, and the methods of chemical analysis that describe significant components present in evidential material seized at these laboratories which enable the method of synthesis to be determined.

Keywords

Hydrochloride Cyanide Alkaloid Anhydride Fentanyl 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard S. Frank
    • 1
  • Stanley P. Sobol
    • 2
  1. 1.Forensic Sciences SectionDrug Enforcement AdministrationUSA
  2. 2.Special Testing and Research LaboratoryDrug Enforcement AdministrationMcLeanUSA

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