Circadian Clock and Light Regulated Transcription of the Wheat Cab-1 Gene in Wheat and in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

  • E. Adam
  • M. Szell
  • A. Pay
  • E. Fejes
  • F. Nagy
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 50)

Abstract

Light plays an indispensable role throughout the life span of higher plants. It provides energy for photosynthesis and has profound effects on gene expression. The alterations in the activity of specific genes triggered by fluctuations in ambient light quality and quantity culminate in a variety of developmental responses (Kuhlemeier et al., 1987).

Keywords

Chlorophyll Germinate Photosynthesis Dock 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Adam
    • 1
  • M. Szell
    • 1
  • A. Pay
    • 1
  • E. Fejes
    • 1
  • F. Nagy
    • 2
  1. 1.Biological Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of SciencesInstitute of Plant PhysiologySzegedHungary
  2. 2.Also Friedrich-Miescher InstituteBaselSwitzerland

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