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Local Litholytic Agents: Dissolution of Cholesterol Biliary Tract Stones with Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether

  • J. L. Thistle
  • B. T. Petersen
  • J. E. McCullough
  • C. E. Bender
  • A. J. LeRoy
Conference paper

Abstract

An estimated 20 million persons in the United States have or have had gallstones, and 80% of these stones are composed predominantly of cholesterol. Efforts to dissolve gallstones with cholesterol solvents are predicated on the premise that removal of the cholesterol will allow the remaining stone components, primarily calcium bilirubinate and calcium carbonate, to be aspirated from the gallbladder or passed spontaneously. Rapidly effective cholesterol solvents have been utilized in the laboratory for decades but have been too toxic or impractical for clinical use. Diethyl ether, for example, rapidly dissolves cholesterol but has a boiling point of 35 °C and expands 225-fold when introduced into the body.

Keywords

Cystic Duct Shock Wave Lithotripsy Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy Cholesterol Stone Gallbladder Mucosa 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. L. Thistle
    • 1
  • B. T. Petersen
    • 1
  • J. E. McCullough
    • 1
  • C. E. Bender
    • 1
  • A. J. LeRoy
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of GastroenterologyMayo ClinicRochesterUSA

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