Rodent Carcinogenicity Studies: Their Value and Limitations

  • G. A. Boorman
  • S. L. Eustis
  • M. R. Elwell
  • R. A. Griesemer
Conference paper
Part of the ILSI Monographs book series (ILSI MONOGRAPHS)

Abstract

While we have known since the late 1700s that certain chemicals cause cancer in man, large programs for screening the carcinogenic potential of chemicals have been initiated only in recent decades. The emphasis for cancer testing in the United States occurred with the passage of the National Cancer Act of 1971 (Page 1977). The demonstration that vinyl chloride caused cancer in man provided further impetus for testing, since 4 years earlier vinyl chloride had been shown to cause cancer in rats (Viola et al. 1971).

Keywords

Toxicity Ozone Vinyl Radon Butylate 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. A. Boorman
    • 1
  • S. L. Eustis
    • 1
  • M. R. Elwell
    • 1
  • R. A. Griesemer
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Triangle ParkUSA

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