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Suppression of Cellular Gene Activity in Adenovirus-Transformed Cells

  • A. J. van der Eb
  • H. T. M. Timmers
  • R. Offringa
  • A. Zantema
  • S. J. L. van den Heuvel
  • J. A. F. van Dam
  • J. L. Bos
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 144)

Abstract

The transforming and oncogenic potential of adenoviruses is localized in the early region 1 (E1), one of the regions of the viral genome expressed in the early phase of the lytic infection. E1 is approximately 4000 base pairs long and consists of two transcriptional units, E1A and E1B. In transformed cells E1A codes for two coterminal mRNAs specifying two related proteins, whereas E1B codes for one mRNA which is translated into two unrelated proteins (for reviews, see: Bernards and Van der Eb 1984; Branton et al. 1985).

Keywords

Cytoplasmic Body Major Histocompatibility Antigen Immunocompetent Animal Quantitative Immunofluorescence SV40 Large Tumor Antigen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. van der Eb
    • 1
  • H. T. M. Timmers
    • 1
  • R. Offringa
    • 1
  • A. Zantema
    • 1
  • S. J. L. van den Heuvel
    • 1
  • J. A. F. van Dam
    • 1
  • J. L. Bos
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical BiochemistrySylvius LaboratoriesLeidenThe Netherlands

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