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Brain Dynamics pp 302-310 | Cite as

Epileptic Phenomena in the Neocortex: From Activity of Single Neurons to Field Potentials of Neuronal Pools

  • H. Pockberger
  • E.-J. Speckmann
  • J. Walden
Part of the Springer Series in Brain Dynamics book series (SSBD, volume 2)

Abstract

In the past epileptic phenomena have been identified by such terms as “hyperexcitation” or “hypersynchronization.” These terms, which are merely descriptive, come from studies of EEG phenomena such as spikes, sharp waves, and spike-wave complexes. As these electrographic features (graphoelements) imply overwhelming excitatory processes, one was inclined to think of an epileptic focus as an aggregate of neurons totally in a state of excitation and virtually devoid of inhibition.

Keywords

Single Neuron Cortical Layer Cortical Surface Epileptic Activity Epileptic Focus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Pockberger
  • E.-J. Speckmann
  • J. Walden

There are no affiliations available

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