Regulated Expression of lacZ Gene Fusions in Tobacco

  • T. H. Teeri
  • H. Lehväslaiho
  • M. Franck
  • J. Uotila
  • P. Heino
  • E. T. Palva
  • M. van Montagu
  • L. Herrera-Estrella
Conference paper

Abstract

Analysis of gene regulation with fusions to reporter genes has proved to be successful in many biological systems including both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The regulatory regions of the genes under study are joined to the coding sequence of the reporter gene and subsequent to transfer of the gene fusion into the host cell, the activity of the reporter gene product will reflect the activity of the regulatory regions. A good choice of the reporter gene allows convenient, standard and quantitative meas?rement of gene expression and, in some cases, detection of reporter gene activity directly in the tissue. Genes such as nptll, cat, luc and uidA have been used to monitor the activity of plant promoters controlling their expression in transgenic plants (Bevan et al. 1983 ; Herrera-Estrella et al. 1983 ; Ow et al. 1986; Jefferson et al. 1987). These genes code for the enzymes neomycin phosphotransferase II, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, the firefly luciferase and β-glucuronidase (GUS) respectively, which are relatively easy to assay.

Keywords

Chlorophyll Germinate Polypeptide Carotenoid Lactose 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. H. Teeri
    • 1
  • H. Lehväslaiho
    • 1
    • 3
  • M. Franck
    • 1
  • J. Uotila
    • 1
  • P. Heino
    • 1
    • 4
  • E. T. Palva
    • 1
    • 4
  • M. van Montagu
    • 2
  • L. Herrera-Estrella
    • 2
    • 5
  1. 1.Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Department of GeneticsUniversity of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland
  2. 2.Laboratorium voor GeneticaRijksuniversiteit GentGentBelgium
  3. 3.Transplantation Laboratory and Department of VirologyUniversity of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland
  4. 4.Department of Molecular GeneticsSwedish University of Agricultural SciencesUppsalaSweden
  5. 5.Department of Plant Genetic EngineeringCINVESTAV, Unidad IrapuatoIrapuato, GTOMexico

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