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Wechselwirkende Arten

  • Christian Wissel

Zusammenfassung

Im letzten Kapitel wurden die Eigenschaften isolierter Populationen studiert. Auf diese Weise hatten wir die innerartlichen Mechanismen kennengelernt, die Einfluß auf die Populationsdynamik haben. Nun existieren in der Natur aber keine isolierten Populationen. Sie sind immer in ein verzweigtes Nahrungsnetz eingebunden und unterliegen daher vielfältigen Wechselwirkungen mit anderen Arten. Um die Vielzahl von möglichen Wechselwirkungsprozessen zu klassifizieren, unterscheidet man folgende Haupttypen der Wechselwirkung.

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Weiterführende Literatur

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Empirik

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Empirik

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Theorie

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Empirik

  1. Botsford LW, Wickham DE (1978) Age-specific. modeis and dungeness crab. J. Fish. Res. Bd. Can: 35: 833Google Scholar
  2. Bradley DJ, May RM (1978) Consequences of helminth aggregation for the dynamics of schistosomiasis. Proc. Roy. Soc. Tropic. Med. Hyg. 72: 262ffGoogle Scholar
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Theorie

  1. Clark WC, Holling CS (1979) Process models, equilibrium structures, and population dynamics. On the formulation and testing of realistic theory in ecology. In: Halbach U. Jacobs J (eds). Population ecology. Symp. Mainz 1978. Fortschr. Zool. 24, 2/3, Fischer, StuttgartGoogle Scholar
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Empirik

  1. Clark WC, Holling CS (1979) Process models, equilibrium structures, and population dynamics. On the formulation and testing of realistic theory in ecology. In: Halbach U. Jacobs J (eds). Population ecology. Symp. Mainz 1978. Fortschr. Zool. 24, 2/3, Fischer, StuttgartGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian Wissel
    • 1
  1. 1.Fachbereiche Biologie und PhysikPhilipps-Universität MarburgMarburgDeutschland

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