Antarctic Lakes

  • Barbara Javor
Part of the Brock/Springer Series in Contemporary Bioscience book series (BROCK/SPRINGER)

Abstract

Several hypersaline Antarctic lakes have been investigated to determine their chemical constituents, the origin of their salts, and the composition and activity of their biological communities. These lakes are considered oases in desert valleys devoid of higher plants. The challenge of discovery of biological and chemical activities in such extreme environments, characterized by hypersalinity and sometimes sub-zero temperatures, is matched by the challenge of conducting research in such remote areas where logistics problems (i.e., coring through 4 m of ice, frequently inclement weather, and limited numbers of personnel) are compounded by the rather short field season. As a result, most of the relatively large body of literature on these lakes concerns chemical analyses or descriptive biology of samples collected and subsequently analyzed in the laboratory. However, several studies of in situ biological activities have also been made.

Keywords

Fermentation Foam Hydrocarbon Calcite Fractionation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara Javor

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