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Diagnosis of Lumbar Dysraphias by CT Myelography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  • M. Ratzka
  • N. Sörensen
  • M. Nadjmi
  • B. Schuknecht
Conference paper

Abstract

Clinical investigations aim at the least possible delay in cord tethering. Frequent conditions are lipomeningomyeloceles, tight filum, dermoid cysts, and retethering after early myelocele repair (Table 1). Less frequenlty, diastematomyelia occurs if the institution does not have a scoliosis center (Fitz and Harwood-Nash 1975). Dermoids and lipomeningoceles are usually presented for diagnosis in the first year of age. The tight filum, diastematomyelia, and retethering of early closed myeloceles at first develop symptoms or deteriorate during periods of rapid growth at about 5 years of age on average (Hall et al. 1988). This corresponds to our own observations in the past 8 years. Worsening dysraphic signs force one to check the whole CNS to exclude lesions at a higher level.

Keywords

Dermoid Cyst Cord Tether Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Image Dermal Sinus Severe Scoliosis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. [1]
    Fitz CR, Harwood-Nash DC (1975) The tethered conus. Am J Roentgenol Radium Ther Nucl Med 125: 515–523PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. [2]
    Hall WA, Albright AL, Brunberg JA (1988) Diagnosis of tethered cords by magnetic resonance imaging. Surg Neurol 30: 60–64PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Ratzka
  • N. Sörensen
  • M. Nadjmi
  • B. Schuknecht

There are no affiliations available

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