Speciation of Organolead Compounds by GC-AAS

  • R. J. A. Van Cleuvenbergen
  • W. D. Marshall
  • F. C. Adams
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 23)

Abstract

The environmental persistence, fate and toxicological impact of trace elements is directly related to the physico-chemical forms in which they occur. From a chemical viewpoint, three classes of trace element containing species may be distinguished: simple inorganic ions (molecules), organically complexed ions (molecules) and element-organic ions (molecules) containing at least one covalent bond between the trace element and carbon. Each of the many physico-chemical forms (species) of a given trace element has its own characteristic environmental distribution and interactive effects - beneficial or toxic - with living organisms. An increasing awareness of this species-specific behaviour over the course of the past two decades has triggered the development of new analytical opportunities - commonly referred to as speciation analysis - and stimulated the creation of techniques combining separation and specific detection which are now well approaching maturity. Thus speciation, in its generally accepted sense, may be defined as the qualitative (identification) and quantitative determination of the individual chemical forms that comprise the total concentration of the trace element in the sample.

Keywords

Furnace Graphite Arsenic Hexane Selenium 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. J. A. Van Cleuvenbergen
    • 1
  • W. D. Marshall
    • 1
  • F. C. Adams
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of Antwerp (U.I.A.)WilrijkBelgium

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