Cell Separation Events in Poplar in Response to Sulphur Dioxide and Ozone: Involvement of Ethylene

  • Hariklia Kargiolaki
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 35)

Abstract

The harmful effects of sulphur dioxide (SO2) and ozone (O3) on plants, are generally accepted, even if they are not always visible. Growth and yield have been found to decrease even in the absence of any obvious injury (Malhotra and Khan, 1984). Sulphur dioxide symptoms on leaves, in cases of visible injury, include a chlorotic appearance due to the destruction of chlorophyll (Malhotra and Khan, 1984). More advanced injury causes necrotic brownish areas close to the midrib (Barrett and Benedict, 1970). Ozone causes the appearance of sharply defined dot-like lesions or bleached areas. A shiny, oily or waxy appearance of either the upper or the lower surfaces also develops in some plant species. In the severest cases, bifacial necrosis occurs (Hill et al., 1970). Premature leaf abscission has also been reported as a response to both SO2 and O3 (Taylor et al., 1986), but no visual effects on the stem region have so far been reported, for any of the gases. Sometimes, the appearance of lesions or cankers on the main stem or trunk, has been attributed to secondary infections from fungus or bacteria, after plants were stressed by the effects of the gaseous air pollutants (Treshow, 1984).

Keywords

Cellulose Dioxide Chlorophyll Epoxy Superoxide 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hariklia Kargiolaki
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Forestry and Natural ResourcesAristotelian University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece

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