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Identification and Analysis of Genes Involved in Lipopolysaccharide Production and Symbiotic Efficiency in RhizobiumLeguminosarum Biovar Viciae VF39

  • U. B. Priefer
  • D. Kapp
  • S. Preisler
  • J. de Wall
  • A. Pühler
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASIH, volume 36)

Abstract

Bacterial cell surface carbohydrates undoubtedly play an important role in signal exchange between Rhizobium and its host plant during the process of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. As a component of the outer membrane, the rhizobial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been hypothesized to be involved in host- specific recognition by interacting with the lectins of legumes (Wolpert and Albersheim 1976). Recent reports suggest that the function of LPS is, at least in Rhizobium leguminosarum, not restricted to the early events of attachment and recognition (Noel et al 1 986; Cava et al 1 989; DeMaagd et al 1989).

Keywords

EcoRI Fragment Infection Thread Colony Surface Symbiotic Efficiency Symbiotic Phenotype 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. B. Priefer
    • 1
  • D. Kapp
    • 1
  • S. Preisler
    • 1
  • J. de Wall
    • 1
  • A. Pühler
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeneticsUniversity of BielefeldBielefeld 1Federal Republic of Germany

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