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Polarization Sensitivity in Compound Eyes

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Facets of Vision

Abstract

The compound eyes of insects and many other arthropods can detect a basic property of light which normally remains invisible to us: the plane of polarization. Arising by scattering in air and water, as well as by reflection from surfaces (Fig. 1), linearly polarized light (characterized by the E-vector direction) is widespread in nature and provides the sensitive eye with a great deal of extra optical information. How polarized light is analyzed and used by arthropods is the theme of this chapter.

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© 1989 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Rossel, S. (1989). Polarization Sensitivity in Compound Eyes. In: Stavenga, D.G., Hardie, R.C. (eds) Facets of Vision. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-74082-4_15

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-74082-4_15

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